“I Want My Child To Live”: Residents Hope New Project Slows Speed ​​In Asheville

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The City of Asheville is issuing a traffic calming project for certain streets in a neighborhood on the west side.

“It feels like a drag race,” said Keri Walker, a resident of the neighborhood.

Walker has lived on Florida Avenue near Patton Avenue for about two years. Lately, she’s worried about the cars passing by on her street – and the safety of her dog.

“He can easily get on the road, and that really scares me,” she said.

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Even checking mail scares him.

“It’s terrifying because you have to bend over the road to get the mail,” she said.

These are the kinds of stories that helped Asheville City Council vote in favor of a traffic calming project for Walker’s Street.

“I can tell you that we have received many requests to investigate speed issues and that we have a significant delay in completing these studies,” Jessica Morris, deputy director of transportation for Asheville, said at the conference. November 9 municipal council meeting.

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During the meeting, council voted to implement traffic calming measures such as speed bumps on five streets:

  • Florida Avenue
  • Dorchester Avenue
  • Moody Street
  • Riverview Drive
  • Burton Street

Burton Street is where Michael Napolitano lives.

“People use it as a crossing from Patton Avenue to Haywood, and they think that because they don’t have skin in the game, they can drive as fast as they want,” he said. -he declares.

Fast is an understatement, he said.

“Oh, I saw people doing 80 miles an hour,” Napolitano said. “This is not an exaggeration.”

The city says calming devices like speed bumps typically reduce average speed between bumps by 20-25%.

“I hope they slow down on Burton Street because I’m afraid my son will get hit,” Napolitano said.

The city said speed bumps are expected to divert traffic by around 20%.

“It looks like people are accelerating on the road,” Walker said. “You can hear the cars, and sometimes they don’t even stop.”

It is also estimated that the average accident rate will decrease by 13% when these traffic calming measures are put in place. The city officially voted to sign a contract for the appeasement project at its November 9 meeting.

“I hope this helps,” Napolitano said. “I want my child to live.”


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